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Soil organic phosphorus dynamics following perturbation of litter cycling in a tropical moist forest

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dc.contributor.author Vincent, A. G. en
dc.contributor.author Turner, Benjamin L. en
dc.contributor.author Tanner, Edmund V. J. en
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-05T13:59:00Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-05T13:59:00Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.citation Vincent, A. G., Turner, Benjamin L., and Tanner, Edmund V. J. 2010. "<a href="https%3A%2F%2Frepository.si.edu%2Fhandle%2F10088%2F8909">Soil organic phosphorus dynamics following perturbation of litter cycling in a tropical moist forest</a>." <em>European Journal of Soil Science</em>. 61 (1):48&ndash;57. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2389.2009.01200.x">https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2389.2009.01200.x</a> en
dc.identifier.issn 1365-2389
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10088/8909
dc.description.abstract The productivity of tropical lowland moist forests is often considered to be limited by the availability of phosphorus. Organic phosphorus is often abundant in tropical soils, but its role in forest nutrition is largely unknown. We addressed this by using a large-scale litter manipulation experiment to investigate the stability of soil organic phosphorus in a tropical lowland forest in Central Panama. Three years of litter removal reduced the organic phosphorus concentration in the surface 2 cm of mineral soil by 23%, as determined by NaOH-EDTA extraction and 31P-NMR spectroscopy; this included decreases in phosphate monoesters (20%) and DNA (30%). Three years of litter addition (equivalent to adding 6 kg P ha20131 per year) increased soil organic phosphorus by 16%, which included a 31% increase in DNA. We did not detect higher-order inositol phosphates, despite their abundance in mineral soils of temperate ecosystems. Our observed turnover rate suggests that even the 020132-cm layer of the mineral soil contributes a fifth of the total phosphorus needed to sustain above-ground growth in this forest. Soil organic phosphorus is thus likely to make a more important contribution to the nutrition of semi-evergreen forest plants than has hitherto been acknowledged. en
dc.relation.ispartof European Journal of Soil Science en
dc.title Soil organic phosphorus dynamics following perturbation of litter cycling in a tropical moist forest en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.srbnumber 81730
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/j.1365-2389.2009.01200.x
rft.jtitle European Journal of Soil Science
rft.volume 61
rft.issue 1
rft.spage 48
rft.epage 57
dc.description.SIUnit STRI en
dc.description.SIUnit Encyclopedia of Life en
dc.description.SIUnit Forces of Change en
dc.citation.spage 48
dc.citation.epage 57


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