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Nitrogen to phosphorus ratio of plant biomass versus soil solution in a tropical pioneer tree, Ficus insipida

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dc.contributor.author Garrish, Valerie en
dc.contributor.author Cernusak, Lucas A. en
dc.contributor.author Winter, Klaus en
dc.contributor.author Turner, Benjamin L. en
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-06T19:16:35Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-06T19:16:35Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.citation Garrish, Valerie, Cernusak, Lucas A., Winter, Klaus, and Turner, Benjamin L. 2010. "<a href="https%3A%2F%2Frepository.si.edu%2Fhandle%2F10088%2F21171">Nitrogen to phosphorus ratio of plant biomass versus soil solution in a tropical pioneer tree, Ficus insipida</a>." <em>Journal of experimental botany</em>. 61 (13):3735&ndash;3748. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erq183">https://doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erq183</a> en
dc.identifier.issn 0022-0957
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10088/21171
dc.description.abstract It is commonly assumed that the nitrogen to phosphorus (N:P) ratio of a terrestrial plant reflects the relative availability of N and P in the soil in which the plant grows. Here, this was assessed for a tropical pioneer tree, Ficus insipida. Seedlings were grown in sand and irrigated with nutrient solutions containing N:P ratios ranging from 100. The experimental design further allowed investigation of physiological responses to N and P availability. Homeostatic control over N:P ratios was stronger in leaves than in stems or roots, suggesting that N:P ratios of stems and roots are more sensitive indicators of the relative availability of N and P at a site than N:P ratios of leaves. The leaf N:P ratio at which the largest plant dry mass and highest photosynthetic rates were achieved was [~]11, whereas the corresponding whole-plant N:P ratio was [~]6. Plant P concentration varied as a function of transpiration rate at constant nutrient solution P concentration, possibly due to transpiration-induced variation in the mass flow of P to root surfaces. The transpiration rate varied in response to nutrient solution N concentration, but not to nutrient solution P concentration, demonstrating nutritional control over transpiration by N but not P. Water-use efficiency varied as a function of N availability, but not as a function of P availability. en
dc.relation.ispartof Journal of experimental botany en
dc.title Nitrogen to phosphorus ratio of plant biomass versus soil solution in a tropical pioneer tree, Ficus insipida en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.srbnumber 90766
dc.identifier.doi 10.1093/jxb/erq183
rft.jtitle Journal of experimental botany
rft.volume 61
rft.issue 13
rft.spage 3735
rft.epage 3748
dc.description.SIUnit STRI en
dc.description.SIUnit Understanding and Sustaining a Biodiverse Planet en
dc.description.SIUnit Forces of Change en
dc.citation.spage 3735
dc.citation.epage 3748


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