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Genetic influences on mosquito feeding behavior and the emergence of zoonotic pathogens

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dc.contributor.author Kilpatrick, A. M. en
dc.contributor.author Kramer, L. D. en
dc.contributor.author Jones, M. J. en
dc.contributor.author Marra, Peter P. en
dc.contributor.author Daszak, P. en
dc.contributor.author Fonseca, Dina M. en
dc.date.accessioned 2012-02-21T13:49:26Z
dc.date.available 2012-02-21T13:49:26Z
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier.citation Kilpatrick, A. M., Kramer, L. D., Jones, M. J., Marra, Peter P., Daszak, P., and Fonseca, Dina M. 2007. "<a href="https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/17915">Genetic influences on mosquito feeding behavior and the emergence of zoonotic pathogens</a>." <em>American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene</em>. 77 (4):667&ndash;671. en
dc.identifier.issn 0002-9637
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10088/17915
dc.description.abstract The feeding behavior of vectors influences the likelihood of<SUP> </SUP>pathogen invasion and the exposure of humans to vector-borne<SUP> </SUP>zoonotic pathogens. We used multilocus microsatellite genetic<SUP> </SUP>typing of an introduced mosquito vector and DNA sequencing of<SUP> </SUP>mosquito blood meals to determine the impact of hybrid ancestry<SUP> </SUP>on feeding behavior and the emergence of West Nile virus (WNV).<SUP> </SUP>The probability of ancestry of <I>Culex pipiens</I> mosquitoes from<SUP> </SUP>two bionomically divergent forms, form molestus and form pipiens,<SUP> </SUP>influenced the probability that they fed on humans but did not<SUP> </SUP>explain a late summer feeding shift from birds to humans. We<SUP> </SUP>used a simple model to show that the occurrence of pure form<SUP> </SUP>molestus mosquitoes would have decreased the likelihood of WNV<SUP> </SUP>invasion (<I>R</I><SUB>0</SUB> in bird populations) 3- to 8-fold, whereas the<SUP> </SUP>occurrence of pure forms pipiens mosquitoes would have halved<SUP> </SUP>human exposure compared with the hybrids that are present. Data<SUP> </SUP>and modeling suggest that feeding preferences may be influenced<SUP> </SUP>by genetic ancestry and contribute to the emergence of vector-borne<SUP> </SUP>pathogens transmitted by introduced species, including malaria,<SUP> </SUP>and dengue, Chikungunya, yellow fever, and West Nile viruses.<SUP> </SUP> en
dc.relation.ispartof American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene en
dc.title Genetic influences on mosquito feeding behavior and the emergence of zoonotic pathogens en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.srbnumber 55285
rft.jtitle American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
rft.volume 77
rft.issue 4
rft.spage 667
rft.epage 671
dc.description.SIUnit SERC en
dc.description.SIUnit CRC en
dc.description.SIUnit mbc en
dc.description.SIUnit NZP en
dc.citation.spage 667
dc.citation.epage 671


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