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Dispersal and diversity in the earliest North American sauropodomorph dinosaurs, with a description of a new taxon

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dc.contributor.author Rowe, Timothy,B. en
dc.contributor.author Sues, Hans-Dieter en
dc.contributor.author Reisz, Robert R. en
dc.date.accessioned 2012-02-03T20:47:10Z
dc.date.available 2012-02-03T20:47:10Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.citation Rowe, Timothy,B., Sues, Hans-Dieter, and Reisz, Robert R. 2011. "<a href="https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/17624">Dispersal and diversity in the earliest North American sauropodomorph dinosaurs, with a description of a new taxon</a>." <em>Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences</em>. 278 (1708):1044&ndash;1053. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2010.1867">https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2010.1867</a> en
dc.identifier.issn 0962-8452
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10088/17624
dc.description.abstract Sauropodomorph dinosaurs originated in the Southern Hemisphere in the Middle or Late Triassic and are commonly portrayed as spreading rapidly to all corners of Pangaea as part of a uniform Late Triassic to Early Jurassic cosmopolitan dinosaur fauna. Under this model, dispersal allegedly inhibited dinosaurian diversification, while vicariance and local extinction enhanced it. However, apomorphy-based analyses of the known fossil record indicate that sauropodomorphs were absent in North America until the Early Jurassic, reframing the temporal context of their arrival. We describe a new taxon from the Kayenta Formation of Arizona that comprises the third diagnosable sauropodomorph from the Early Jurassic of North America. We analysed its relationships to test whether sauropodomorphs reached North America in a single sweepstakes event or in separate dispersals. Our finding of separate arrivals by all three taxa suggests dispersal as a chief factor in dinosaurian diversification during at least the early Mesozoic. It questions whether a cosmopolitan dinosaur fauna ever existed, and corroborates that vicariance, extinction and dispersal did not operate uniformly in time or under uniform conditions during the Mesozoic. Their relative importance is best measured in narrow time slices and circumscribed geographical regions. en
dc.relation.ispartof Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences en
dc.title Dispersal and diversity in the earliest North American sauropodomorph dinosaurs, with a description of a new taxon en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.srbnumber 98710
dc.identifier.doi 10.1098/rspb.2010.1867
rft.jtitle Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
rft.volume 278
rft.issue 1708
rft.spage 1044
rft.epage 1053
dc.description.SIUnit NH-Paleobiology en
dc.description.SIUnit NMNH en
dc.description.SIUnit Peer-reviewed en
dc.citation.spage 1044
dc.citation.epage 1053


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