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The high fidelity of the cetacean stranding record: insights into measuring diversity by integrating taphonomy and macroecology

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dc.contributor.author Pyenson, Nicholas D. en
dc.date.accessioned 2011-12-20T14:37:36Z
dc.date.available 2011-12-20T14:37:36Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.citation Pyenson, Nicholas D. 2011. "<a href="https%3A%2F%2Frepository.si.edu%2Fhandle%2F10088%2F17512">The high fidelity of the cetacean stranding record: insights into measuring diversity by integrating taphonomy and macroecology</a>." <em>Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences</em>. 278 (1724):3608&ndash;3616. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2011.0441">https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2011.0441</a> en
dc.identifier.issn 0962-8452
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10088/17512
dc.description.abstract Stranded cetaceans have long intrigued naturalists because their causation has escaped singular explanations. Regardless of cause, strandings also represent a sample of the living community, although their fidelity has rarely been quantified. Using commensurate stranding and sighting records compiled from archived datasets representing nearly every major ocean basin, I demonstrated that the cetacean stranding record faithfully reflects patterns of richness and relative abundance in living communities, especially for coastlines greater than 2000 km and latitudinal gradients greater than 4°. Live dead fidelity metrics from seven different countries indicated that strandings were almost always richer than live surveys; richness also increased with coastline length. Most death assemblages recorded the same ranked relative abundance as living communities, although this correlation decreased in strength and significance at coastline lengths greater than 15 000 km, highlighting the importance of sampling diversity at regional scales. Rarefaction analyses indicated that sampling greater than 10 years generally enhanced the completeness of death assemblages, although protracted temporal sampling did not substitute for sampling over longer coastlines or broader latitudes. Overall, this global live dead comparison demonstrated that strandings almost always provided better diversity information about extant cetacean communities than live surveys; such archives are therefore relevant for macroecological and palaeobiological studies of cetacean community change through time. en
dc.relation.ispartof Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences en
dc.title The high fidelity of the cetacean stranding record: insights into measuring diversity by integrating taphonomy and macroecology en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.srbnumber 105635
dc.identifier.doi 10.1098/rspb.2011.0441
rft.jtitle Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
rft.volume 278
rft.issue 1724
rft.spage 3608
rft.epage 3616
dc.description.SIUnit NH-Paleobiology en
dc.description.SIUnit NMNH en
dc.description.SIUnit Peer-reviewed en
dc.citation.spage 3608
dc.citation.epage 3616


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