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Florivory of Early Cretaceous flowers by functionally diverse insects: implications for early angiosperm pollination

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dc.contributor.author Xiao, Lifang en
dc.contributor.author Labandeira, Conrad C. en
dc.contributor.author Dilcher, David en
dc.contributor.author Ren, Dong en
dc.date.accessioned 2021-06-29T02:03:26Z
dc.date.available 2021-06-29T02:03:26Z
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.citation Xiao, Lifang, Labandeira, Conrad C., Dilcher, David, and Ren, Dong. 2021. "<a href="https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/110675">Florivory of Early Cretaceous flowers by functionally diverse insects: implications for early angiosperm pollination</a>." <em>Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences</em>, 288, (1953). <a href="https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2021.0320">https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2021.0320</a>. en
dc.identifier.issn 0962-8452
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10088/110675
dc.description.abstract Florivory (flower consumption) occurs worldwide in modern angiosperms, associated with pollen and nectar consumption. However, florivory remains unrecorded from fossil flowers since their Early Cretaceous appearance. We test hypotheses that earliest angiosperms were pollinated by a diverse insect fauna by evaluating 7858 plants from eight localities of the latest Albian Dakota Formation from midcontinental North America, in which 645 specimens (8.2%) were flowers or inflorescences. Well-preserved specimens were categorized into 32 morphotypes, nine of which displayed 207 instances of damage from 11 insect damage types (DTs) by four functional-feeding groups of hole feeding, margin feeding, surface feeding and piercing-and-sucking. We assessed the same DTs inflicted by known florivores on modern flowers that also are their pollinators, and associated insect mouthpart types causing such damage. The diverse, Dakota florivore–pollinator community showed a local pattern at Braun&#39;s Ranch of flower morphotypes 4 and 5 having piercing-and-sucking as dominant and margin feeding as minor interactions, whereas Dakotanthus cordiformis at Rose Creek I and II had an opposite pattern. We found no evidence for nectar robbing. These data support the rapid emergence of early angiosperms of florivore and associated pollinator guilds expressed at both the local and regional community levels. en
dc.relation.ispartof Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences en
dc.title Florivory of Early Cretaceous flowers by functionally diverse insects: implications for early angiosperm pollination en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.srbnumber 159788
dc.identifier.doi 10.1098/rspb.2021.0320
rft.jtitle Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
rft.volume 288
rft.issue 1953
dc.description.SIUnit NMNH en
dc.description.SIUnit NH-Paleobiology en


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