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Invasive legume management strategies differentially impact mutualist abundance and benefit to native and invasive hosts

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dc.contributor.author Komatsu, Kimberly J. en
dc.contributor.author Simms, Ellen L. en
dc.date.accessioned 2020-01-10T03:00:25Z
dc.date.available 2020-01-10T03:00:25Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.citation Komatsu, Kimberly J. and Simms, Ellen L. 2020. "<a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/rec.13081">Invasive legume management strategies differentially impact mutualist abundance and benefit to native and invasive hosts</a>." <em>Restoration Ecology</em>. 28 (2):378&ndash;386. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/rec.13081">https://doi.org/10.1111/rec.13081</a> en
dc.identifier.issn 1061-2971
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10088/102588
dc.description.abstract Determining the best management practices for plant invasions is a critical, but often elusive goal. Invasive removals frequently involve complex and poorly understood biotic interactions. For example, invasive species can leave potent legacies that influence the success of native species restoration efforts, and positive plant-microbial feedbacks may promote continued reinvasion by an exotic species following restoration. Removal methods can vary in their effects on plant-soil feedbacks, with consequences for restoration of native species. We determined the effects of invasion by a leguminous shrub (French broom; Genista monspessulana) on the density and community composition of, and benefit conferred by, its microbial mutualists in its invading range. Densities of soil-dwelling rhizobia were much higher in areas invaded by G. monspessulana relative to uninvaded areas, and this increased density of rhizobia fed back to increase seedling growth of both the invader and native legumes. We further compared how three techniques for removing G. monspessulana affected the densities of rhizobia relative to areas where G. monspessulana was still present. Removal by hand-pulling reduced soil rhizobial densities, and reduced growth of one native legume, while having no effect on the growth of the invader. Overall, our results show that the consequences of restoration techniques, both above- and belowground, could be critical for the successful removal of an invasive legume and restoration of native species. en
dc.relation.ispartof Restoration Ecology en
dc.title Invasive legume management strategies differentially impact mutualist abundance and benefit to native and invasive hosts en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.srbnumber 153743
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/rec.13081
rft.jtitle Restoration Ecology
rft.volume 28
rft.issue 2
rft.spage 378
rft.epage 386
dc.description.SIUnit SERC en
dc.citation.spage 378
dc.citation.epage 386
dc.relation.url https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/rec.13081


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